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FFLink
There is.
+1,380|4135|Devon, England
But Geography was so boring...
FatherTed
xD
+3,936|3944|so randum
i did physics too, just didn't pay much attention
Small hourglass island
Always raining and foggy
Use an umbrella
Superior Mind
Member
+1,730|4137
Forget geography yo, geology is where it's at.
FatherTed
xD
+3,936|3944|so randum
geography unless you really specialise in university includes geology.
Small hourglass island
Always raining and foggy
Use an umbrella
AussieReaper
( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)
+5,759|3597|what

Astronomy is a better field to study than Astrology.
https://i.imgur.com/maVpUMN.png

"coz you a far cry from acclaim nigga ubisoft"
Superior Mind
Member
+1,730|4137
In the US I'm pretty sure geology is a separate course of study. Geography is more the study of spatiality/maps/populations whereas geology is, well you know.
Mutantbear
Semi Constructive Criticism
+1,430|3409|London, England

rocks
_______________________________________________________________________________________________ https://i.imgur.com/Xj4f2.png
ROGUEDD
BF2s. A Liberal Gang of Faggots.
+452|2833|Fuck this.
and dirt
Make X-meds a full member, for the sake of 15 year old anal gangbang porn watchers everywhere!
RTHKI
MOTOGPGPGPGPGPGPGP
+1,614|4181|THE X GAMES
Gravel
https://static.bf2s.com/files/user/6644/Xj4f2.png
AussieReaper
( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)
+5,759|3597|what

minerals and electrolytes
https://i.imgur.com/maVpUMN.png

"coz you a far cry from acclaim nigga ubisoft"
ROGUEDD
BF2s. A Liberal Gang of Faggots.
+452|2833|Fuck this.
It's what plants crave.

Last edited by ROGUEDD (2012-04-14 22:05:05)

Make X-meds a full member, for the sake of 15 year old anal gangbang porn watchers everywhere!
Superior Mind
Member
+1,730|4137
If you wish to understand any sort of fossils you must also understand the medium in which they lay.

https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/9807/sl9g_hst_big.gif
Impact on Jupiter
unnamednewbie13
Moderator
+1,741|4216|Banoi, PNG

Does Jupiter remind anyone else of a great big marble made out of petrified wood?
Superior Mind
Member
+1,730|4137
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0411/jupiterTriple_hst_full.jpg
eleven bravo
Member
+1,398|2703|foggy bottom
Jupiter's surface is a sea of yellowish cloud tops that roil with winds continually circling the great planet. The gales whip around the equator at double our hurricane speeds (340 mph, 550 km/h).

It's windy here, and cold. The temperature on the surface is about -235 degrees F (-150 C), which is twice as cold as the coldest spot in Antarctica.

Surface clouds form alternating bands of color, which speed in opposite directions, like passing trains. Yellow bands are the tops of great convective bubbles buoyed by a gas and liquid-hydrogen 'soup' heated by Jupiter's 36,000-degree F (20 000 C) core. Reddish brown bands are lower cloud layers that ride descending convective currents. Yellow-band clouds blow easterly and red-band ones whip across the planet westerly. Fierce tornados rage between bands.

The most spectacular sight on Jupiter's surface is the Great Red Spot, a high-pressure storm gyrating in the opposite direction from Earth's low-pressure hurricanes. We Earthlings have watched this long-lasting storm for almost 400 years, since we invented the telescope in 1608.


We can't land here on Jupiter's surface, since it's a sea of cloud tops, but we can get warmer by descending. Buffeted by extreme winds, we descend, and the pressure mounts. The winds don't subside. They continue to blow about 450 mph (725 km/h) all the way down the atmosphere (at least as far as we've probed). Lightning flashes in the distance, as we dip below the upper cloud base.

The temperature increases to a balmy 70 degrees F (21 C), as we continue down. Here is where life might exist, although the pressure is ten times Earth's surface pressure. We don't want to go down more. In December of 1995, the single probe we sent deeper into the atmosphere (130 miles (200 km)) melted and vaporized, where pressure crushed it with twenty times Earth's surface pressure.

Jupiter's heat is a fossil from 4.6 billion years ago, when planets coalesced from an ancient cloud of gas and dust. If the proto-Jupiter had attracted 50 times more mass, then Jupiter's core would have gone nuclear, and become a star. This many eons later, Jupiter still radiates twice as much heat as it receives from the sun.

Moreover, the residual heat apparently fuels the fierce winds that lash the planet's atmosphere, according to Jonathan Aurnou, UCLA assistant professor of planetary physics, who has modeled convective currents deep within. The convective currents maintain much the same pattern and, therefore, Jupiter's cloud patterns stay largely unchanged through the centuries, unlike ours, which change in minutes.

We do, however, "see storms appear and disappear on Jupiter," e-mails astronomer Jim O'Donnell of the Royal Observatory Greenwich in London. "The overall structure of the dark and light equatorial cloud bands is permanent. Jupiter's rotation, however, whips them into bands. The same effect creates atmospheric bands on Earth that move in opposite directions, too. But Jupiter hurls its bands at manic speed because it is big and rotates much faster
Tu Stultus Es
Dilbert_X
The X stands for
+1,591|3550|eXtreme to the maX
https://i.imgur.com/7j19Q.jpg
Comet Hale-Bopp

50mm f1.8, 30s, HP5 Iso1000 Accuspeed
Your virus system is infected with windows. Please to be giving me your credit card details urgently
unnamednewbie13
Moderator
+1,741|4216|Banoi, PNG

Thread's making me want to crack open my case of Ben Bova books.
DonFck
Hibernator
+3,226|4076|Turku, Finland

Double eclipse, January 4th, 2011.

https://i.imgur.com/X0Anj.jpg
https://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t63/DonFck/SG-sig1.jpg
unnamednewbie13
Moderator
+1,741|4216|Banoi, PNG

I like the tie fighter.
DonFck
Hibernator
+3,226|4076|Turku, Finland

Not sure if you're being serious, but that's the ISS.
https://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t63/DonFck/SG-sig1.jpg
eusgen
Nugget
+402|4237|Jupiter

DonFck wrote:

Not sure if you're being serious, but that's the ISS.
Coincidence they look alike? I think not.
RTHKI
MOTOGPGPGPGPGPGPGP
+1,614|4181|THE X GAMES
deja vu
https://static.bf2s.com/files/user/6644/Xj4f2.png
eleven bravo
Member
+1,398|2703|foggy bottom

DonFck wrote:

Not sure if you're being serious, but that's the ISS.
there was just as equal a chance for that being a TIE fighter
Tu Stultus Es
Shocking
sorry you feel that way
+333|3444|...

eleven bravo wrote:

Jupiter's surface is a sea of yellowish cloud tops that roil with winds continually circling the great planet. The gales whip around the equator at double our hurricane speeds (340 mph, 550 km/h).

It's windy here, and cold. The temperature on the surface is about -235 degrees F (-150 C), which is twice as cold as the coldest spot in Antarctica.

Surface clouds form alternating bands of color, which speed in opposite directions, like passing trains. Yellow bands are the tops of great convective bubbles buoyed by a gas and liquid-hydrogen 'soup' heated by Jupiter's 36,000-degree F (20 000 C) core. Reddish brown bands are lower cloud layers that ride descending convective currents. Yellow-band clouds blow easterly and red-band ones whip across the planet westerly. Fierce tornados rage between bands.

The most spectacular sight on Jupiter's surface is the Great Red Spot, a high-pressure storm gyrating in the opposite direction from Earth's low-pressure hurricanes. We Earthlings have watched this long-lasting storm for almost 400 years, since we invented the telescope in 1608.


We can't land here on Jupiter's surface, since it's a sea of cloud tops, but we can get warmer by descending. Buffeted by extreme winds, we descend, and the pressure mounts. The winds don't subside. They continue to blow about 450 mph (725 km/h) all the way down the atmosphere (at least as far as we've probed). Lightning flashes in the distance, as we dip below the upper cloud base.

The temperature increases to a balmy 70 degrees F (21 C), as we continue down. Here is where life might exist, although the pressure is ten times Earth's surface pressure. We don't want to go down more. In December of 1995, the single probe we sent deeper into the atmosphere (130 miles (200 km)) melted and vaporized, where pressure crushed it with twenty times Earth's surface pressure.

Jupiter's heat is a fossil from 4.6 billion years ago, when planets coalesced from an ancient cloud of gas and dust. If the proto-Jupiter had attracted 50 times more mass, then Jupiter's core would have gone nuclear, and become a star. This many eons later, Jupiter still radiates twice as much heat as it receives from the sun.

Moreover, the residual heat apparently fuels the fierce winds that lash the planet's atmosphere, according to Jonathan Aurnou, UCLA assistant professor of planetary physics, who has modeled convective currents deep within. The convective currents maintain much the same pattern and, therefore, Jupiter's cloud patterns stay largely unchanged through the centuries, unlike ours, which change in minutes.

We do, however, "see storms appear and disappear on Jupiter," e-mails astronomer Jim O'Donnell of the Royal Observatory Greenwich in London. "The overall structure of the dark and light equatorial cloud bands is permanent. Jupiter's rotation, however, whips them into bands. The same effect creates atmospheric bands on Earth that move in opposite directions, too. But Jupiter hurls its bands at manic speed because it is big and rotates much faster
thank you pace
inane little opines
ROGUEDD
BF2s. A Liberal Gang of Faggots.
+452|2833|Fuck this.
<3


https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/56/Mars_Valles_Marineris.jpeg
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