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usmarine
Banned
+2,785|4235

Recommend:
Eat This, Not That

Pretty good book collection.  Kind of surprising at the same time.  It may shock some of you who think you are eating "healthy."

http://www.menshealth.com/eatthis/index.php
Kmar
Truth is my Bitch
+5,695|4074|132 and Bush

Recommend:
America's Hidden History: Untold Tales of the First Pilgrims, Fighting Women, and Forgotten Founders Who Shaped a Nation
*  The story of the first real Pilgrims in America, who were wine-making French Huguenots, not dour English Separatists
    * The coming-of-age story of Queen Isabella, who suggested that Columbus pack the moving mess hall of pigs that may have spread disease to many Native Americans
    * The long, bloody relationship between the Pilgrims and Indians that runs counter to the idyllic scene of the Thanksgiving feast
    * The little-known story of George Washington as a headstrong young soldier who committed a war crime, signed a confession, and started a war!
The book takes you up to George Washington's inauguration. If you like American history you will enjoy this book. I have read similar books about "American hidden history", this was easily my favorite.

http://www.amazon.com/Americas-Hidden-H … 0061118184

9/10
Xbone Stormsurgezz
Spark
liquid fluoride thorium reactor
+874|4148|Canberra, AUS
Recommend: Two books, both on the same subject - and no prizes for guessing what it is.

1. The Weather Makers (Tim Flannery)


Most of us suspect that climate change is happening, but is it a terrible threat to our world or an exaggerated beat up? Or is it something in between - an issue that humanity must eventually face, but not yet?

In this groundbreaking and essential new book, Tim Flannery argues passionately for the urgent need to address - NOW - the implications of a global climate change that is damaging all life on earth and endangering our very survival.

This book is unimpeachable in its authority, deftly and accessibly written in its vision for what each of us can do to avoid catastrophe. It is a global call to arms, laying out plainly if not controversially what we know, what we think might happen, and what tools we have available to us to make a difference. The Weather Makers will change your life.

It is a difficult subject and hard for people to evaluate dispassionately because it entails deep political and industrial implications, and because it arises from the very core processes of our civilisation's success. Right now our fate is in our hands, for we are the weather makers and we already possess the tools required to avoid catastrophic climate change.


Easily the finest and most scientific analysis of climate change and everything scientific to do with it I've yet seen. Not so great on economic issues or on "the way foward" but it doesn't pretend to be an answer to everything.


http://www.theweathermakers.org/

2. Hot, Flat, and Crowded (Tom Friedman)

Thomas L. Friedman's no. 1 bestseller The World Is Flat has helped millions of readers to see globalization in a new way. Now Friedman brings a fresh outlook to the crises of destabilizing climate change and rising competition for energy—both of which could poison our world if we do not act quickly and collectively. His argument speaks to all of us who are concerned about the state of America in the global future.

Friedman proposes that an ambitious national strategy—which he calls "Geo-Greenism"—is not only what we need to save the planet from overheating; it is what we need to make America healthier, richer, more innovative, more productive, and more secure.

As in The World Is Flat, he explains a new era—the Energy-Climate era—through an illuminating account of recent events. He shows how 9/11, Hurricane Katrina, and the flattening of the world by the Internet (which brought 3 billion new consumers onto the world stage) have combined to bring climate and energy issues to Main Street. But they have not gone very far down Main Street; the much-touted "green revolution" has hardly begun. With all that in mind, Friedman sets out the clean-technology breakthroughs we, and the world, will need; he shows that the ET (Energy Technology) revolution will be both transformative and disruptive; and he explains why America must lead this revolution—with the first Green President and a Green New Deal, spurred by the Greenest Generation.

Hot, Flat, and Crowded is classic Thomas L. Friedman—fearless, incisive, forward-looking, and rich in surprising common sense about the world we live in today.
A detailed look at energy use in the 21st century in relation to the three big issues of our time: climate change, population growth and a rising middle class across the world. Gives a very detailed analysis of the consequences of our energy habits (not just environmental, but social - energy poverty - and political - petrodicatorship). Moreover, looks at the way forward with an economic eye.

http://www.thomaslfriedman.com/bookshel … nd-crowded

Last edited by Spark (2009-01-02 21:48:02)

The paradox is only a conflict between reality and your feeling what reality ought to be.
~ Richard Feynman
Kmar
Truth is my Bitch
+5,695|4074|132 and Bush

Lol.. Spark I am reading one right now regarding that topic. I'm going to recommend it to you just to see your reaction.

Undecided
Red Hot Lies: How Global Warming Alarmists Use Threats, Fraud, and Deception to Keep You Misinformed
From the author of the New York Times bestselling Politically Incorrect Guide(tm) to Global Warming (and Environmentalism) comes Red Hot Lies, an exposé of the hypocrisy, deceit, and outright lies of the global warming alarmists and the compliant media that support them. Did you know that most scientists are global warming skeptics? Or that environmental alarmists have knowingly promoted false and exaggerated data on global warming? Or that in the Left's efforts to suppress free speech (and scientific research), they have compared global warming dissent with "treason"?
http://www.amazon.com/Red-Hot-Lies-Alar … 1596985380

I'm reading it now because I like to hear all sides of the argument. I've heard plenty from the other side of the debate.

I must confess, I have the audiobook.
Xbone Stormsurgezz
SEREMAKER
BABYMAKIN EXPERT √
+2,187|4042|Mountains of NC

Recommend:
Lone Survivor: The Eyewitness Account of Operation Redwing and the Lost Heroes of SEAL Team 10

this is the story of fire team leader Marcus Luttrell, the sole survivor of Operation Redwing, and the desperate battle in the mountains that led, ultimately, to the largest loss of life in Navy SEAL history. But it is also, more than anything, the story of his teammates, who fought ferociously beside him until he was the last one left-blasted unconscious by a rocket grenade, blown over a cliff, but still armed and still breathing. Over the next four days, badly injured and presumed dead, Luttrell fought off six al Qaeda assassins who were sent to finish him, then crawled for seven miles through the mountains before he was taken in by a Pashtun tribe, who risked everything to protect him from the encircling Taliban killers.
http://www.amazon.com/Lone-Survivor-Eye … 0316067598
https://static.bf2s.com/files/user/17445/carhartt.jpg
Poseidon
Fudgepack DeQueef
+3,253|4011|Long Island, New York
Recommend:

Defiance: The Bielski Partitions by Nechama Tec

The prevailing image of European Jews during the Holocaust is one of helpless victims, but in fact many Jews struggled against the terrors of the Third Reich. In Defiance, Nechama Tec offers a riveting history of one such group, a forest community in western Belorussia that would number more than 1,200 Jews by 1944--the largest armed rescue operation of Jews by Jews in World War II. Tec reveals that this extraordinary community included both men and women, some with weapons, but mostly unarmed, ranging from infants to the elderly. She reconstructs for the first time the amazing details of how these partisans and their families--hungry, exposed to the harsh winter weather--managed not only to survive, but to offer protection to all Jewish fugitives who could find their way to them.
http://www.amazon.com/Defiance-Bielski- … amp;sr=1-1

Is now a movie starring Daniel Craig. Probably one of the best books you can read about not only the Holocaust, but WWII.
rdx-fx
...
+955|4065
Recommend;
Ghost Wars: The Secret History of the CIA, Afghanistan, and Bin Laden, from the Soviet Invasion to September 10, 2001
Steve Coll's Ghost Wars: The Secret History of the CIA, Afghanistan, and Bin Laden, from the Soviet Invasion to September 10, 2001 offers revealing details of the CIA's involvement in the evolution of the Taliban and Al Qaeda in the years before the September 11 attacks. From the beginning, Coll shows how the CIA's on-again, off-again engagement with Afghanistan after the end of the Soviet war left officials at Langley with inadequate resources and intelligence to appreciate the emerging power of the Taliban. He also demonstrates how Afghanistan became a deadly playing field for international politics where Soviet, Pakistani, and U.S. agents armed and trained a succession of warring factions. At the same time, the book, though opinionated, is not solely a critique of the agency. Coll balances accounts of CIA failures with the success stories, like the capture of Mir Amal Kasi. Coll, managing editor for the Washington Post, covered Afghanistan from 1989 to 1992.
http://www.amazon.com/Ghost-Wars-Afghan … amp;sr=8-1
Kmar
Truth is my Bitch
+5,695|4074|132 and Bush

Do not recommend:

The Politically Incorrect Guide to American History
http://www.amazon.com/Politically-Incor … 0895260476

Almost everything--you know about American history is wrong, because most textbooks and popular history books are written by left-wing academic historians who treat their biases as fact. But fear not, Professor Thomas Woods has written the perfect antidote. This delightful book--funny and inviting, but factually sound-shatters the myths about American history and separates fact from fiction.
Even this book was too right for me. The bias was so obnoxious I found myself struggling to finish it. Agenda driven doesn't even begin to explain it.
Xbone Stormsurgezz
Kmar
Truth is my Bitch
+5,695|4074|132 and Bush

rdx-fx wrote:

Recommend;
Ghost Wars: The Secret History of the CIA, Afghanistan, and Bin Laden, from the Soviet Invasion to September 10, 2001
I was getting there . Great book!
Xbone Stormsurgezz
Uzique
dasein.
+2,865|3944
Well in that case Kmarion I'll just cream a random title from my Amazon recently ordered/Wishlist... I keep lists on Amazon all the time, completely obsessed with fuckin' books.

Recent recommendation:

Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus by Ludvig Wittgenstein.

Perhaps the most important work of philosophy written in the twentieth century, "Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus" was the only philosophical work that Ludwig Wittgenstein published during his lifetime. Written in short, carefully numbered paragraphs of extreme brilliance, it captured the imagination of a generation of philosophers. For Wittgenstein, logic was something we use to conquer a reality which is in itself both elusive and unobtainable. He famously summarized the book in the following words: 'What can be said at all can be said clearly; and what we cannot talk about we must pass over in silence.' David Pears and Brian McGuinness received the highest praise for their meticulous translation. The work is prefaced by Bertrand Russell's original introduction to the first English edition.
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Tractatus-Logic … mp;s=books

A brilliant read, open to every reader through its own concept and thesis to denounce the over-complication of philosophy.
libertarian benefit collector - anti-academic super-intellectual. http://mixlr.com/the-little-phrase/
SgtHeihn
Should have ducked
+394|3960|Ham Lake, MN (Fucking Cold)
Recommend:
Sympathy For the Devil
Reflecting the author's own experiences, the characters in this graphic, grippingly authentic first novel are the combat-tested soldiers of the Special Forces in Vietnam. Quinn, nerveless, seemingly made of granite and steel, amuses hismelf and some onlookers by biting off the heads of live ducklings. Hanson, the protagonist, who begins his mornings with beer and amphetamines, not only enlisted for service in Nam while in law school but signed on for an extra year for the privilege of joining the elite corps. "College boy" though he isa term of contempt mixed with envyhis patriotic credientials are unimpeachable: he, too, can't abide hippies, draft dodgers, antiwar protesters and other "sloths." When Quinn is accidentally killed by blundering American troops, Hanson exacts bizarre, deranged, murderous revenge in a wild climactic scene that serves to compound the novel's ambiguous perspective on war in general and the Vietnam conflict in particular. Though a skillful writer, Anderson's depiction of war is a shade too melodramatic and cinematic, too much a way of separating the men from the boys. Yet he vividly involves the reader in the unending nightmare thatHanson is "doomed to survive."
http://www.amazon.com/Sympathy-Devil-Ke … 0553580876

Devil's Guard
The ashes of World War II were still cooling when France went to war in Vietnam. In that struggle, its frontline troops were the misfits, criminals and mercenaries of the French Foreign Legion. And among these, none were so bloodstained as the veterans of the German SS.
http://www.alibris.com/search/books/qwo … ls%20Guard
(I have a e copy of this book that I can send you becaue the cheapest I have found is $20+ used)
There has been debate about this book being fact or fiction, but it is still a glimpse into how the SS dealt with Gorillas.

Generation Kill
Wright rode into Iraq on March 20, 2003, with a platoon of First Reconnaissance Battalion Marines—the Marine Corps' special operations unit whose motto is "Swift, Silent, Deadly." These highly trained and highly motivated First Recon Marines were the leading unit of the American-led invasion force. Wright wrote about that experience in a three-part series in Rolling Stone that was hailed for its evocative, accurate war reporting. This book, a greatly expanded version of that series, matches its accomplishment. Wright is a perceptive reporter and a facile writer. His account is a personality-driven, readable and insightful look at the Iraq War's first month from the Marine grunt's point of view. It jibes with other firsthand reports of the first phase of the Iraqi invasion (including David Zucchino's Thunder Run), showing the unsettling combination of feeble and vicious resistance put up by the Iraqi army, the Fedayeen militiamen and their Syrian allies against American forces bulldozing through towns and cities and into Baghdad. Wright paints compelling portraits of a handful of Marines, most of whom are young, street-smart and dedicated to the business of killing the enemy. As he shows them, the Marines' main problem was trying to sort out civilians from enemy fighters. Wright does not shy away from detailing what happened when the fog of war resulted in the deaths and maimings of innocent Iraqi men, women and children. Nor does he hesitate to describe intimately the few instances in which Marines were killed and wounded. Fortunately, Wright is not exposing the strengths and weaknesses of a new generation of American fighting men, as the misleadingly hyped-up title and subtitle indicate. Instead, he presents a vivid, well-drawn picture of those fighters in action on the front lines in the blitzkrieg-like opening round of the Iraq War.
I liked this book, it gave more of a face to Marines then your common war book these days. Plus I can relate to a lot of the stuff they went through with stupid people in charge.
http://www.amazon.com/Generation-Kill-E … 0399151931

The Last True Story I will Ever Tell
Having joined the National Guard for the tuition benefits, Crawford, like many of his contemporaries, never expected to do any heavy lifting. Early on, he admits his is "the story of a group of college students... who wanted nothing to do with someone else's war." But when his Florida National Guard unit was activated, he was shipped to Kuwait shortly before the invasion of Iraq. Armed with shoddy equipment, led by incompetent officers and finding release in the occasional indulgence in pharmaceuticals, Crawford cared little for the mission and less for the Iraqis. "Mostly we were guarding gas stations and running patrols," he explains. As for Iraqi civilians, "I didn't give a shit what happened to any of them," he confesses after inadvertently saving an Iraqi boy from a mob beating. Crawford's disdain grows with each extension of his tour, and he leaves Iraq broke, rudderless and embittered. Unfortunately, Crawford dresses up his story in strained metaphors and tired clichés such as "truth engulfed me like a storm cloud" and "you can never go back home." Despite its pretensions, Crawford's story is not the classic foot soldier's memoir and should provide enough gristle to please military memoir fans.
http://www.amazon.com/Last-True-Story-E … 157322314X

Last edited by SgtHeihn (2009-01-02 23:35:37)

rdx-fx
...
+955|4065
Recommend.
1776 David McCullogh

Esteemed historian David McCullough covers the military side of the momentous year of 1776 with characteristic insight and a gripping narrative, adding new scholarship and a fresh perspective to the beginning of the American Revolution.
http://www.amazon.com/1776-David-McCull … amp;sr=8-1

This author has a true gift for making history read like a thriller novel.
rdx-fx
...
+955|4065
Recommend.
One Bullet Away - The Making of a Marine Corps Officer
Nathaniel Fick
http://www.amazon.com/One-Bullet-Away-M … 0618556133

Nathaniel Fick was the LT in Generation Kill
Read it just after Generation Kill
rdx-fx
...
+955|4065
Recommend.
The Nuclear Jihadist Douglas Frantz & Catherine Collins
The true story of the man (A.Q. Khan) who sold the world's most dangerous secrets... and how we could have stopped him
Story of the "Father of the Islamic Nuke", A.Q. Khan

http://www.amazon.com/Nuclear-Jihadist- … amp;sr=1-1

Last edited by rdx-fx (2009-01-02 23:44:40)

Spark
liquid fluoride thorium reactor
+874|4148|Canberra, AUS

Kmarion wrote:

Lol.. Spark I am reading one right now regarding that topic. I'm going to recommend it to you just to see your reaction.

Undecided
Red Hot Lies: How Global Warming Alarmists Use Threats, Fraud, and Deception to Keep You Misinformed
From the author of the New York Times bestselling Politically Incorrect Guide(tm) to Global Warming (and Environmentalism) comes Red Hot Lies, an exposé of the hypocrisy, deceit, and outright lies of the global warming alarmists and the compliant media that support them. Did you know that most scientists are global warming skeptics? Or that environmental alarmists have knowingly promoted false and exaggerated data on global warming? Or that in the Left's efforts to suppress free speech (and scientific research), they have compared global warming dissent with "treason"?
http://www.amazon.com/Red-Hot-Lies-Alar … 1596985380

I'm reading it now because I like to hear all sides of the argument. I've heard plenty from the other side of the debate.

I must confess, I have the audiobook.
I've read things like that, and they generally make me lol. And I thought environmentalists were alarmist...

TBH I'm not sure what else you'd expect from a non-scientific lawyer from the CEI (which is where he comes from). I do wonder about their motives sometimes - are they doing it because they legitimately believe in good science (unlikely given his background) or are they just looking to protect an outdated system - and their own asses, to boot.

But no, PM me some of his arguments. I'd like to hear 'em, because skeptics with any credibility left are becoming increasingly hard to find. Michael Crichton was good, but he's dead

On that note, I recommend State of Fear by Michael Crichton. Some of his theories on the IPCC are somewhat far-fetched (given how conservative (small c) they are with their estimates) but if you want to know how to do scientific skepticism PROPERLY, read it and pay close attention to the notes after the end of the story.

Last edited by Spark (2009-01-02 23:57:51)

The paradox is only a conflict between reality and your feeling what reality ought to be.
~ Richard Feynman
rdx-fx
...
+955|4065
Recommend.
House to House SSG David Bellavia
Staff sergeant Bellavia's account of the fierce 2004 fighting in Fallujah will satisfy readers who like their testosterone undiluted. Portraying himself as a hard-bitten, foul-mouthed, superbly trained warrior, deeply in love with America and the men in his unit, contemptuous of liberals and a U.S. media that fails to support soldiers fighting in the front lines of the global war on terror, Bellavia begins with a nasty urban shootout against Shiite insurgent militias. Six months later, his unit prepares to assault the massively fortified city of Fallujah in a ferocious battle that takes up the rest of the book. Anyone expecting an overview of strategy or political background to the war has picked the wrong book. Bellavia writes a precise, hour-by-hour account of the fighting, featuring repeated heroic feats and brave sacrifice from Americans but none from the enemy, contemptuously dismissed as drug-addled, suicidal maniacs. Readers will encounter a nuts-and-bolts description of weapons, house-to-house tactics, gallantry and tragic mistakes, culminating with a glorious victory that, in Bellavia's view, will go down in history with the invasion of Normandy. Like a pitch-by-pitch record of a baseball game, this detailed battle description will fascinate enthusiasts and bore everyone else.
Love that review.  But not for the reasons the reviewer intended.

http://www.amazon.com/House-Soldiers-Me … amp;sr=1-1
destruktion_6143
Was ist Loos?
+154|4100|Canada
Recommend:
Spandau Phoenix - Greg Iles
A long-buried Nazi secret erupts into a nerve-shattering nightmare, as fact meets fiction in this explosive international thriller.

In 1941, Rudolf Hess, Hitler's fanatical Deputy Fuhrer, shocked the world by flying on a seemingly mad peace mission to Britain. He was captured there, and after the war, spent the rest of his life behind the forbidding walls of Berlin's Spandau prison

In 1987, with that sole remaining prisoner's death, Spandau is razed, and the strangest, most mysterious chapter of World War II is closed forever...Or is it?

The answer to this question is a decisive and deadly no for Berlin police sergeant Hans Apfel. In the rubble of Spandau, Hans discovers a sheaf of tattered papers in a hollowed brick. It is the half-mad diary of Prisoner #7, known to the world as Rudolf Hess. And it holds the first shocking revelation of why Hess flew to Britain, and the terrifying dimensions of Hitler's boldest, most brilliant move at the height of his evil genius.

Thus the most vicious and momentous competition in the annals of international espionage is set in motion. In a Germany moving toward unity, in a Soviet Union falling part, and an Israel facing destruction, the most skilled players of the post-glasnost era will stop at nothing to seize the Spandau papers. Brutal violence, global intrigue, treason, and terror turn innocent bystanders into desperate combatants - in a world where nations battle for supremacy and trust is another word for suicide.
-I loved it. the suspense mixed with WW2 history flashbacks was amazing.

Spandau Phoenix

Also the Covert One Series by Robert Ludlem

Call it an addiction, but i LOVE this series. the suspense, the action, everything is great about this series

Last edited by destruktion_6143 (2009-01-03 00:05:08)

Spark
liquid fluoride thorium reactor
+874|4148|Canberra, AUS
Also the Covert One Series by Robert Ludlem

Call it an addiction, but i LOVE this series. the suspense, the action, everything is great about this series
Also recommend. I think Clancy does the whole bio-war/bio-terrorism thing more realistically done in Executive Orders, but this is a exciting series of books.
The paradox is only a conflict between reality and your feeling what reality ought to be.
~ Richard Feynman
Spearhead
Gulf coast redneck hippy
+731|4163|Tampa Bay Florida
Recommend:

A Bridge Too Far - Cornelius Ryan

wikipedia wrote:

A Bridge Too Far, a non-fiction book by Cornelius Ryan published in 1974, tells the story of Operation Market Garden, a failed Allied attempt to break through German lines at Arnhem in the occupied Netherlands during World War II in September 1944. The title of the book comes from a comment made by British Lt. Gen. Frederick Browning, deputy commander of the First Allied Airborne Army, who told Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery before the operation, "I think we may be going a bridge too far."

Prior to Ryan's book, Market Garden had been a classic example of victors writing the history. Popular histories of World War II of the time usually tended to not mention the battle at all, mention it in passing or put Montgomery's spin on it as being a partial success.[1]

A Bridge Too Far was responsible for bringing to the general public's attention the full extent of this massive operation, including a catalogue of errors and miscalculations, whilst highlighting the extreme bravery of the participants. Though largely accurate, Ryan's disregard for Montgomery is clearly discernible and is sometimes evident in skewed observations of the operation
- I loved it.  Theres a shitload of material to read so it was difficult for me to get through the entire thing without a few long breaks here and there.  But definitely read this book if you consider yourself a WW2 history buff or even an amateur history buff.

http://www.amazon.com/Bridge-Too-Far-Cl … amp;sr=8-3

Last edited by Spearhead (2009-01-03 09:36:41)

Kmar
Truth is my Bitch
+5,695|4074|132 and Bush

Recommend:

Wisdom of Our Fathers: Lessons and Letters from Daughters and Sons
http://www.amazon.com/Wisdom-Our-Father … 1400064805
What does it really mean to be a good father? What did your father tell you, that has stayed with you throughout your life? Was there a lesson from him, a story, or a moment that helped to make you who you are? Is there a special memory that makes you smile when you least expect it?

After the publication of Tim Russert’s number one New York Times bestseller about his father, Big Russ & Me, he received an avalanche of letters from daughters and sons who wanted to tell him about their own fathers, most of whom were not superdads or heroes but ordinary men who were remembered and cherished for some of their best moments–of advice, tenderness, strength, honor, discipline, and occasional eccentricity.

Most of these daughters and sons were eager to express the gratitude they had carried with them through the years. Others wanted to share lessons and memories and, most important, pass them down to their own children.

This book is for all fathers, young or old, who can learn from the men in these pages how to get it right, and to understand that sometimes it is the little gestures that can make the big difference for your child. For some in this book, the appreciation came later than they would have liked. But as Wisdom of Our Fathers reminds us, it is never too late to embrace it.

From the father who coached his daughter in sports (and life), attending every meet, game, performance, and tournament, to the daughter who, after a fifteen-year estrangement, learned to make peace with her difficult father just before he died, to the son who came, at last, to appreciate the silent way his father could show affection, Wisdom of Our Fathers shares rewarding lessons, immeasurable gifts, and lasting values.

Heartfelt, humorous, engaging, irresistibly readable, and bound to bring back memories of unforgettable moments with our own fathers, Tim Russert’s new book is not only a fitting companion to his own marvelous memoir, but also a celebration of the positive qualities passed down from generation to generation.
Should be required reading if you plan on parenting. Russert was an excellent writer.
Xbone Stormsurgezz
kylef
Gone
+1,352|3967|N. Ireland
Recommend

The Corporation: The Pathological Pursuit of Profit and Power
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Corporation-Pat … 1845291743
The Corporation is a slim handbook telling you everything you need to know about corporate power in six short, easily accessible chapters, accompanying one of the most powerful and engaging documentaries of the year. He starts by describing how the corporation rose from humble beginnings to become the world’s most dominant institution—an institution that determines what we eat, watch, wear, where we work and what we do. To understand how the corporation acquired such monumental power one need only look at how, over time, this institution managed to shake off its legal constraints, and with it, any compelling need to behave as a moral entity. The law has granted the corporation the status of a ‘person’ and as such, Bakan argues, it should be recognized for what it truly is: a psychopath. In fact the central message of the book is to soberly reveal the fact that the corporation has a legally defined mandate to relentlessly pursue—without exception—its own self-interest regardless of the often harmful consequences it might cause to others. Lying, stealing, killing are not rare aberrations but the duty of the corporation when it serves the interests of its shareholders to do so.
It's a very interesting and mind-opening book. It put thoughts and ideas into my head that I would never have thought, but now that I read them I can't see how I missed it (for example, how people made a fortune with gold by 9/11 - it's "silver" lining). Very well written and definitely recommended if you are interested in how entities are driven and manipulated.
Superior Mind
Member
+1,730|4166
Two recommends.

Hamlet - Billy Shakes
Prince of Denmark seeks vengeance for the murder of his father, the king.
This is my favorite Shakespeare work. Some great comedy in it, if you can find it.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamlet

American Gods - Neil Gaiman.
This is an interesting insight of the idea of what a god is. Story follows an ex-con named Shadow who is hired by a mysterious man to be him assistant.
A fun way to learn about old myths if you are not in to reading historical or religious texts. (Not that I don't like those)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Gods
Vax
Member
+42|3325|Flyover country
Some good stuff here, a few already on my shelf

On the Iraq theme, I recommend:
 
Waging Peace: A Special Operations Team's Battle to Rebuild Iraq by  Rob Schultheis 
https://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51TF5B0PSML._SL160_.jpg

From Publishers Weekly
Veteran war correspondent Schultheis (Night Letters: Inside Wartime Afghanistan) spent six months in Iraq with an Army Civil Affairs Team, a highly trained, elite unit whose primary objective is rebuilding war-torn regions. Despite the overwhelming need for such soldiers in Iraq, Afghanistan and elsewhere, the army has only a single active-duty Civil Affairs Battalion, and the overwhelming majority of the 5,000 Civil Affairs soldiers are in the army reserves. The dedicated professionals of Civil Affairs Team A-13 featured here are a disparate group of civilian soldiers. Led by a former Special Forces major, the team includes an ex–Peace Corps volunteer, a California surfer girl, a former Marine sniper with a heart of gold and "Fat Larry," an accountant from middle America. Civil Affairs soldiers never initiate combat, but it finds them often enough. As they go about rebuilding schools, repairing sewers and setting up mobile walk-in medical clinics, they also must dodge roadside bombs, snipers and mortars. Schultheis quickly bonds with Team A-13 and celebrates their small victories against difficult odds in a surreal environment, delivering warm character studies and tense highway encounters. And he ends up making a terrific case for a full update of the Marshall Plan.
Like the review says, it's about a reconstruction team working in Baghdad, a lesser known side of the iraq war history; interesting and not too heavy or long. 

Amazon Link
 
Recommend:

Night Draws Near: Iraq's People in the Shadow of America's War by Anthony Shadid
https://www.motherjones.com/arts/books/2005/09/shadid_265x349.jpg
Amazon.com Review
Most of the accounts of the Iraq War so far have been, to use the term the war made famous, embedded in one way or another: many officially so with American troops, most others limited--by mobility, interest, or understanding--to the American experience of the conflict. In Night Draws Near, Washington Post reporter Anthony Shadid writes about a side of the war that Americans have heard little about. His beat, for which he won a Pulitzer Prize in 2004, is the territory outside the barricaded, air-conditioned Green Zone: the Iraqi streets and, more often, the apartments and houses, darkened by blackouts and shaken by explosions, where most Iraqis wait out Saddam, the invasion, and three nearly unbroken decades of war.

Shadid is Lebanese American, born in Oklahoma, and he has a fluency in Arabic and an understanding of Arab culture that give him a rare access to and a great empathy for the people whose stories he tells. Beginning in the days leading up to the American invasion and closing with an epilogue on the January 2005 elections, he talks with Iraqis from a wide range of stations, from educated Baghdad professionals who look back on the country's golden days in the 1970s to a sullen, terrified group of Iraqi policemen in the Sunni Triangle, shunned as collaborators for taking jobs with the Americans to feed their families. (Perhaps his most telling and characteristic moment is when he trails behind an American patrol, recording the often hostile Iraqi comments that the soldiers themselves can't understand.) He takes the ground view and gives his witnesses the particularity they deserve, but the various voices share an exhaustion with a country that has seen nothing but war for 30 years and a frustration with a liberator that has not fulfilled its promises of prosperity and order. It's a despairing but eye-opening account, told with an understanding of the Iraqi people--hospitable, proud, and often desperate--that, were it more common, might have led to a different outcome than the one he describes. --Tom Nissley
Excellent, if somewhat sad, read. A view from "the other side" so to speak. One comes away with an appreciation and empathy for what Iraq has been through.

Amazon

I found both of these titles at my city library btw..they are both worth owning, but if you're broke or just cheap, library FTW

Last edited by Vax (2009-01-03 15:28:46)

FEOS
Bellicose Yankee Air Pirate
+1,182|3884|'Murka

Recommend:

The Kite Runner and A Thousand Splendid Suns, both by Khaled Hosseini.

The writing style is immersive, taking the reader back to pre-Soviet invasion Afghanistan, through civil war and Taliban rule. Helps a westerner better understand the many cultural schisms that make up Afghan society.

In the middle of A Thousand Splendid Suns right now.
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The Road by Cormac McCarthy

From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. Violence, in McCarthy's postapocalyptic tour de force, has been visited worldwide in the form of a "long shear of light and then a series of low concussions" that leaves cities and forests burned, birds and fish dead and the earth shrouded in gray clouds of ash. In this landscape, an unnamed man and his young son journey down a road to get to the sea. (The man's wife, who gave birth to the boy after calamity struck, has killed herself.) They carry blankets and scavenged food in a shopping cart, and the man is armed with a revolver loaded with his last two bullets. Beyond the ever-present possibility of starvation lies the threat of roving bands of cannibalistic thugs. The man assures the boy that the two of them are "good guys," but from the way his father treats other stray survivors the boy sees that his father has turned into an amoral survivalist, tenuously attached to the morality of the past by his fierce love for his son. McCarthy establishes himself here as the closest thing in American literature to an Old Testament prophet, trolling the blackest registers of human emotion to create a haunting and grim novel about civilization's slow death after the power goes out.
Very interesting writing style...something I've never seen from another author. The internal struggle of the main character is very moving.
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Anything by Michael Curtis Ford or Conn Iggulden. Both write very similar historical fiction.

Last edited by FEOS (2009-01-03 21:48:32)

“Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid.”
― Albert Einstein

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